Bachmann chairman in S.C. introduced bill to consider creation of state currency

lee-bright

Source: Sen. Lee Bright’s Facebook page.

Rep. Michele Bachmann announced Tuesday that her presidential campaign chairman in South Carolina, where the first shots of the Civil War were fired, is state Sen. Lee Bright, who has made comments about secession and introduced a bill to study whether the state should start printing its own currency.

“Michele Bachmann is the candidate who doesn’t just give lip service to conservative principles but actively lives them out every day,” Bright said in a statement. “She is the conservative who has been consistent in her record and her rhetoric.”

Bright introduced his bill to study the creation of a new South Carolina currency earlier this session. The resolution argues that the right to print currency can flow from the state’s constitutional police powers.

“[M]any widely recognized experts predict the inevitable destruction of the Federal Reserve System’s currency through hyperinflation in the foreseeable future,” the resolution reads. ”[I]n the event of hyperinflation, depression, or other economic calamity related to the breakdown of the Federal Reserve System, for which the state is not prepared, the state’s governmental finances and private economy will be thrown into chaos, with gravely detrimental effects upon the lives, health, and property of South Carolina’s citizens, and with consequences fatal to the preservation of good order throughout the state.”

If passed, the legislation would appoint a subcommittee to come up with a plan for an alternative currency.

“South Carolina can avoid or at least mitigate many of the economic, social, and political shocks to be expected to arise from hyperinflation, depression, or other economic calamity related to the breakdown of the Federal Reserve System only through the timely adoption of an alternative sound currency that the state’s government and citizens may employ without delay in the event of the destruction of the Federal Reserve System’s currency,” according to the resolution.

It was last year that Bright played a major role in helping to pass a non-binding, but contentious, affirmation of South Carolina’s sovereignty under the U.S. Constitution.

“If at first you don’t secede, try again,” Bright joked to the Spartanburg Herald-Journal after the sovereignty bill’s passage. ”I think all of our rights are under assault, but assault on the 9th and 10th amendments is the most egregious.”

Comments

6 Comments

Randy
Comment posted November 15, 2011 @ 12:27 pm Another “Constitutional Conservative” who can’t be troubled to read the Constitution. See Article I, section 10 on states printing or coining their own money.


Chayanov
Comment posted November 15, 2011 @ 12:50 pm I’m sure those South Carolina dollars will hold their value as well as Confederate scrip did.


Dog is my Shepherd
Comment posted November 15, 2011 @ 2:02 pm As a demonstration of leadership, I suggest Mr. “Bright” and his comrades start accepting their pay in this new currency (the “Goober”?) as of now.


Gerry
Comment posted November 15, 2011 @ 8:22 pm D@mn, I love Michelle Bachmann! Hers is professional grade crazy! Never seen a politician so unencumbered by facts


KingofthePaupers
Comment posted November 16, 2011 @ 2:53 pm Lee Bright pretty bright: Bright introduced his bill to study the creation of a new South Carolina currency earlier this session. The resolution argues that the right to print currency can flow from the state’s constitutional police powers.
Jct: Just like Kucinich’s NEED Act is going to work. Both are exactly the same principle as used by Argentine to go from being broke in 2001 to all foreign debts paid off in 2006 using small-denomination provincial bonds which could be used for Hydro, Taxes, Medical, Licenses, just like Treasury Greenbacks would. Both are government chips paid out in exchange for labor! Both back by labor. Youtube Argentine Solution for info on how bright Kucinich and Bright are.


Mark
Comment posted November 22, 2011 @ 12:23 pm I guess Sherman didn’t go far enough in his march to the sea. Maybe he should have gone through the whole South.